PSAPs Are Cheaper, So WhyShould I Buy Hearing Aids?

PSAPs Are Cheaper, So WhyShould I Buy Hearing Aids?

PSAPs Are Cheaper, So WhyShould I Buy Hearing Aids?

Hearing aids are perceived as costly, and some people may seek out less expensive alternatives called Personal Sound Amplification Products (PSAPs). These alternatives can cost anywhere from $20 to hundreds of dollars, but are they really a “good” choice? Keep reading to find out. 

David Gauvey Herbert recently outlined the extent to which composer Richard Einhorn has gone to help himself cope with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss in an article for Bloomberg Business "Bluetooth Earpieces Do Battle With the $3,000 Hearing Aid: Advances in circuitry and Bluetooth have made hearing aid alternatives cheaper and more powerful."

Top Five Benefits to Wearing Hearing Aids

Top Five Benefits to Wearing Hearing Aids

Top Five Benefits to Wearing Hearing Aids

If you’re on the fence about hearing aids, you’re not alone. Hearing loss is a common health condition that affects nearly 50 million Americans according to research supported by the World Health Organization.  

But contrary to popular belief, hearing loss doesn’t just affect the elderly. A study by Johns Hopkins published in The Archives of Internal Medicine found that 1 in 5 Americans age 12 and older have hearing loss severe enough to adversely impact communication.

Rechargeable hearing aids are a reality

If you wear hearing aids, you know how important batteries are to their performance. You also know how inconvenient it can be to buy hearing aid batteries, ensure you have spares with you, or change them in the middle of an event or conversation. 

With ZPower®, our new rechargeable battery technology, you no longer need to worry about running out of power or replacing hearing aid batteries mid-activity. You can relax, knowing you’ll have continuous, stable and uninterrupted hearing aid use throughout your day.

Hearing Loss Linked to Dementia

Adults with hearing loss are significantly more likely than adults with normal hearing to develop dementia, according to a new study out today from researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging. The study – which finds that the greater the hearing loss, the higher the risk – may open a new avenue of research into dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Men and women in the study who experienced severe hearing loss were five times more likely to develop dementia than those with normal hearing. But even mild hearing loss doubled the risk of dementia.

Hearing Loss Costs Far More Than Ability to Hear

Mark Hammel’s hearing was damaged in his 20s by machine gun fire when he served in the Israeli Army. But not until decades later, at 57, did he receive his first hearing aids.

“It was very joyful, but also very sad, when I contemplated how much I had missed all those years,” Dr. Hammel, a psychologist in Kingston, N.Y., said in an interview. “I could hear well enough sitting face to face with someone in a quiet room, but in public, with background noise, I knew people were talking, but I had no idea what they were saying. I just stood there nodding my head and smiling.